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Drupal, my blog, Views, and the grand experiment

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Drupal

Lately I've been getting more and more unhappy with blogging under Drupal. Specifically, I'm developing a serious dislike (bordering on hate) for the blog module that ships with Drupal. Regular visitors to this site, CookingWithLinux.com, and my new occasiodaily FOSS and Linux news show, WFTL Bytes!, have already figured out that I'm experimenting with new topics, new content, and new ways of delivering that content. Aside from the sites and content I've mentioned, I want to start talking and writing about other things that excite me, whether it be Linux, science, politics, or religion. What I thought I wanted was a blog with sub-blogs so I could focus each of my blogs on a particular topic and let you, the reader, choose the topics that interested you. What I achieved was more confusion and the beginnings of a grand experiment to do away with the blog module entirely.

My own personal site now has several hundred documents in it. It would, in fact, have hundreds more had I not decided to break some of that content out into other sites. CookingWithLinux.com is meant to focus primarily on my Cooking With Linux column, which appears monthly in the Linux Journal, and which I've been writing for nearly ten years. Because CWL has such a huge following and people seem to love the idea of being part of it, I opened it up to readers (and members of my WFTL LUG to create their own content as well as share wine reviews (along with my own occasional tasting reports). WFTL Bytes! is a video news show that covers the Linux and FOSS news scene with a little humor and a little attitude. Nothing more complicated.

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