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Ubuntu is not ready for human beings

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Ubuntu

I'm a human being and I like Linux including the command line stuff. I use Debian, Ubuntu and OpenSuse on daily basis. I would like to recommend Linux to other human beings. Ubuntu is the most popular choice. However from Edgy Eft to Intrepid Ibex Ubuntu has regularly disappointed me.

1. Updating Ubuntu to a new release is simple, but each time it will break something. This may be true for other operating systems, too, but Ubuntu releases 16 times more often then Microsoft does. No human being wants his most important device broken twice a year.

2. If you don't test it, it doesn't work, right? I can make a long list of packages in each Ubuntu release (all repositories because I don't know or care which packages are in "universe" or somewhere else) which have never been tested by the maintainer. I can usually fix it by editing a conf file, setting file permissions, etc, but it doesn't make a good impression if the default configuration doesn't work.

The points above can be blamed on Ubuntu's release schedule which allows only two month from "feature freeze" to the final release.

Rest Here




Why I am not rushing to Intrepid.

The author makes a good point. It has only been a few weeks since I found the madwifi driver that enables my wireless to work in Hardy Heron. Happy Day!

But the fix is different in Intrepid, with a new driver and different install instructions with commands I am not familiar with. I know in advance wifi will again be broken before I upgrade. I've fine tuned Hardy to my satisfaction so why risk it?

For those that do, it might be better to wait for the "point" release, i.e., 8.10.1 when the worst bugs get fixed. As for myself, I'll wait to see what Jaunty Jackelope has to offer.

I am a little puzzled on what a "configuration tool" is supposed to configure. Ubuntu has a Preferences menu where all kinds of options can be set. What can I configure in OpenSUSE that I can't confifigure in Ubuntu?

If you don't like it, move on to another distro...

I'm not an Ubuntu fan. I have used it, and it's an okay distro, but my favorite is PCLinuxOS. However, your choice of distro is personal. Different distros take different approaches and they each have their fanbase. If you don't like the way distro X does things, then use distro Y. It's that simple.

The author states that he didn't much care for YaST, but has he tried Mandrake Control Center, or PCLinuxOS Control Center (same thing with some mods)? It's an incredible configuration application. There is a distro out there for the author, but bashing Ubuntu or any other distro simply isn't the route to go. Just move on to something else. There are plenty of distros out there, and something's gotta hit the right chord for the author.

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