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More Quake 4 goodies

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Gaming

The console and .cfg file have a host of tweaks and tricks ready for the user to explore. We outline some of the basics you should know.

They are obviously tweaking a windows file, but I've tried out several of these and yes, they do work with the Linux version as well. One of the most handy is the startup addendum:

+set com_allowConsole 1 +disconnect

This of course allows the "~" console pulldown aaannd, the best is the +disconnect that bypasses that 3 manufacturer intro. Much better than hitting "ESC" three times. Big Grin

That Link.

And my gawd, someone actually took over 700 screenshots and put together this walkthru.

Where was this before I finished yesterday!? Actually quake 4 was quite easy to navigate and figure out what to do next. I'm either getting better at this kind of thing, or quake 4 was just easy to follow. Big Grin The doors and "pathways" were lighted, many times green for open and red for locked, so the course was kinda obvious. None of the twist and turns, retracing steps, and guess work we found in Doom.

Anyway, that walkthrough here.

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On the boundaries of GPL enforcement

Last October, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) and Free Software Foundation (FSF) jointly published "The Principles of Community-Oriented GPL Enforcement". That document described what those organizations believe the goal of enforcement efforts should be and how those efforts should be carried out. Several other organizations endorsed the principles, including the netfilter project earlier this month. It was, perhaps, a bit puzzling that the project would make that endorsement at that time, but a July 19 SFC blog post sheds some light on the matter. There have been rumblings for some time about a kernel developer doing enforcement in Germany that might not be particularly "community-oriented", but public information was scarce. Based on the blog post by Bradley Kuhn and Karen Sandler, though, it would seem that Patrick McHardy, who worked on netfilter, is the kernel developer in question. McHardy has also recently been suspended from the netfilter core team pending his reply to "severe allegations" with regard to "the style of his license enforcement activities". Read more

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