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Open source nuclear bunker guards finance data

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OSS

Somewhere outside a remote village in Kent, we pull up to a gate smothered in barbed wire and CCTV cameras. The former Ministry of Defence site, is now owned by a data-hosting and resilience company. The Bunker is a relic of the Cold War.

The bunker is electromagnetic pulse- and nuclear bomb-proofed. The underground building has a fully-meshed telecoms infrastructure and is wired up to two electricity grids.

It's the ultimate place for the just-in-case scenario. It has airlocks, diesel tanks for 770,000 litres of weeks' worth of fuel and ex-military personnel patrolling the site. Police still use the ground for training and disaster scenarios.

Most of The Bunker's customers are financial firms, including Scottish Widows and Moneybookers, some of whom also use the resilience service with a sister bunker in Newbury.

The Bunker team build open source systems for clients, attempting to embed security from the bottom up.

Full Story.

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