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Xubuntu 8.10 - Review

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Ubuntu

Why Xubuntu?
Well, in keeping with my need for speed and my love of the Xfce desktop, my next partition filler is Xubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex.

What do I need day to day?
I like speed and stability. To be honest I find Gnome and Kde do not live up to my perception of speed, so I choose Xfce and Fluxbox. Maybe too minimal for some people, but i am happy with the command-line, can hack the config files to suit my needs, and have spent a few years shaping my general distro setup. I only have apps and features which complete my daily tasks.

Does Xubuntu offer what I need?
Basically yes. And that is a surprised yes. Why? because I always found Ubuntu to be less than what it's fanbois profess, I would say "meh!" to the latest hype that came with Ubuntu's latest 6-monthly-offering, and continue tweaking Dreamlinux and Arch.

What about Xubuntu 8.10 specifically?
To be honest, I am blown away with its progress. The changes in the look, feel, and performance are quite considerable. Now I am not anti-Ubuntu, just anti-hype, so for me to say that Xubuntu is good, surprised even myself.

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