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slashdot effect

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I can only apologize for the slowness and inaccessibility of the site past coupla days and that one other occurrence last month I guess it was. I was /.'d last month and osnews'd yesterday (continuing today). I can't really do much about it right now. I subscribe to bellsouth's largest business pipe in our area, but it's still quite limited upstream. The only way I can think of to alleviate this condition is to perhaps consider off-site hosting. I don't really want to do this for several reasons, but the main one is the financial considerations. Fortunately (or unfortunately - depending upon how you look at it) this only happens once in a while, so I guess I'll (we'll?) have to just live with it for now. If this issue continues to come up, I'll look at my alternatives more closely.

Some folks have joked that my site had been taken down, and for now this hasn't been true. As my logs will testify, my server continued to function at all times, saddly I ran out of pipe. I have a fair amount of confidence in apache (and drupal) to handle large loads and hopefully we won't have to deal with that issue.

Anyway, all that to say, thanks so much for visiting my little corner of the web. It's gratifying to receive so many hits on my original work, yet it's kinda a double-edge blade, and you, the visitor, bear the brunt. I'm sorry I don't have the bandwidth to handle those large loads so no one is denied access or their visit is painfully slow. I can't thank you enough for visiting and your comments. And of course, special thanks to pclinuxonline, Slashdot, osnews, userlocal and all the others for carrying my stories.

Thank you sincerely,
Susan

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re: /. effect [solved]

Well, two wonderful things happened since posting this blog. Number one, dot.kde.org linked to my story, so that's where a lot of the traffic this morning was coming from. However, upon getting complaints from users not being able to connect, they set links using coral cache. Oh man, why haven't I heard of that before?

It seems to be a free distributed network kinda thing. So, if I ever experience that slashdot effect again, I can employ their service. A wonderful solution.

So, thanks to dot.kde.org for picking up my story and for planting the seed of an idea to alleviate the problem in the future.

I hope I have that problem in the future. Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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