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One reason why Linux fits in the real world better

For the last month, every time insert one of the four pieces of 512mb ram, Windows (Vista and XP) get a blue screen of death on start up. But, just out of interest, I decided to see if the problem also persists with OpenSuse Linux. So I booted up the system and selected OpenSuse. OpenSuse started up (and worked) like a charm, like there was nothing wrong.

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re: One Reason

Well that's a nice fantasy, but it's not true.

If you have bad memory, it doesn't matter if one OS boots and the other "ignores" it. Your data from that point on is suspect and you'd be a fool to let the OS (and your hypothetical cash registers) continue to chug on.

Use Memtest+ and fix your memory problem, not fawn over how one OS is too stupid to care.

Thats not the point

Yeah, sure, I can go fix it, but that's not the point. The point is the the memory problem is ignored by the Linux Kernel while the Windows Kernel just simply too stupid to skip over it, (It doesn't even get to the Windows logo on start up). This reflects the flexibility, not how stupid it is (The Linux Kernel is known to be much more flexible and sophisticated than the Windows Kernel, mainly because its based on the Unix Kernel, which is used in the most sophisticated systems).

Um....No

The Windows Kernel is LARGER, which is why a memory fault in the lower region would cause Windows not to load. Linux has a SMALLER kernel (but not for long if each and every release continues to bloat up like Shelly Winters at a All-You-Can-Eat Pizza Bar) so it blissfully ignores a SERIOUS problem and boots anyways.

There is no magic happening in the Linux boot, it doesn't have a clue that there is bad memory (and has no way to adjust for it even if it did know), it just requires less working ram to get off the deck.

So...

Ok, if your so smart, then why does almost every single user of Windows has experienced a blue screen of death at least once in their use of Windows, while Linux does not suffer the same problem? Oh yeah, maybe its because the Windows Kernel is so Large that it just cant continue to work when something is a little off? Maybe its a good thing that the Linux kernel doesn't give a crap about the problem, at least I don't suffer from a constantly rebooting system like you seem to be keen on putting up with if it comes around.

Anyways, the fact is that you can still use Linux while Windows in just unusable. The use of Linux simply makes this problem obsolete.

Oh yeah, and if Linux ignores this ***SERIOUS*** problem, then my is my computer still working just fine after hours and hours of running on the the faulty RAM?

http://blackravenplace.net76.net give us a visit!

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