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Synfig: the free software alternative for 2D animation

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Software

For a long time 2D animation software has been dominated by proprietary software. Other common multimedia tasks such as video playing, editing, raster and vector 2D graphics and 3D graphics or animation are currently being covered properly by free software / open source (FOSS) but there wasn’t enough FOSS alternatives for computer aided 2D animation.

Synfig increases the 2D animation software available with a brilliant and professional piece of software.

Synfig was primary developed by Voria, an animation company founded by Robert Quattlebaum who was also the lead software engineer of the software. In 2004 Voria shut down and was discontinued. Fortunately Robert decided to license Synfig under the GNU GPL and turned it over the free software community to develop and use.

Synfig has no comparable alternative software in the FOSS world. Unlike other FOSS that can be used to produce 2D animation (ktoon, pencil) in the “traditional” frame to frame animation, the Synfig workflow is based on vector primitives and their interpolation in time.

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