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The Windows 7 GUI from a Linux user's perspective

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Today, hard core Linux users were able to view for the first time some of nifty GUI features in Microsoft's next generation desktop operation system - Windows 7. Due out in Q3 2009, Windows 7 shows us that Microsoft has listened to consumers. They've gone to great lengths to bypass many of the annoying shortcomings in Vista's UI. Still, not many Linux users were impressed. The only significant feature Linux doesn't already include natively in its many free versions is multi-touch. But will these nifty new Windows 7 features be enough to keep Microsoft's user base happy? Or is it finally time for a change?

Windows 7 - Vista on steroids

If you loved Vista in Aero Glass mode, then you'll love Windows 7 even more. Windows 7 addresses many of the shortcomings in Vista, including management for those annoying popup notification messages, gadgets which are no longer locked in the sidebar (they can now be moved anywhere on the desktop), several UI enhancements which are not only attractive, but also require less mouse clicks to carry out routine functions, HomeGroup networking which automatically separates out your business and home network connections (including printers and peripherials), the ability to move app buttons on the start bar, and of course direct multi-touch support for all of Microsoft's Windows 7 apps.

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