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Why Failed – and What to Do About It

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Last week I noted that the release of 3.0 seems to mark an important milestone in its adoption, judging at least by the healthy – and continuing – rate of downloads. But in many ways, success teaches us nothing; what is far more revealing is failure.

And here we have an in-depth study of just such a failure of

we present a case study on the Belgian Federal Public Service (FPS) Economy which considered the use of, but eventually decided not to adopt as their primary office suite.

The reasons for that failure are the following:

our results seem to indicate that the adoption of open source desktop software in an advanced, data–intensive organization is still problematic.

rest here

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