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Finance Ministry of Latvia: Considering Open Source

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OSS

Gradual transition to open source software at government institutions is a proposal that should be given serious consideration, stressed the Finance Ministry of Latvia.

The Finance Ministry already uses various open source solutions for the maintenance of its IT infrastructure, reports LETA.

As to open source office software, the Finance Ministry points out that it is freeware, which is a positive aspect, however, the maintenance of such software requires additional financial and human resources and re-training of users.

An important factor against such software is the problem of Latvianization of the software.

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