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Review: Dell Linux laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

This is a review of my new Dell Linux laptop, an Inspiron 1525. Let’s start with:

Why I wanted a Dell

1. Linux comes pre-installed.
Now that’s the sort of thing I want to support! I am not a Windows user, and I’m tired of paying for Windows when I buy a new computer.

2. So everything should just work, right?

I’ve installed different Linux distributions many times over the years. I know that sometimes things should work but don’t, and then I have to find drivers or odd technical fixes on the web before my Linux system will work perfectly. But this time, I was sure it would be different. Since Dell is selling computers that come with Linux already installed, I figured that Dell would make sure that the entire system works just the way it should.

3. It’ll be the Linux solution for my friends.

And here’s what happened




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