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OpenOffice 3.0 Final ready & is it good enough

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OOo

OpenOffice.org 3.0 Final has already been uploaded to a variety of mirror download sites ahead of the official announcement Monday 13.

Release notes have yet to be updated from Release Candidate 4.

Bit more here




Also:

OK, obviously there’s more to this story than my tongue-in-cheek answer. This came up after one of our supercool, power user secretaries (who is an Office 2003/2007 wiz) ran a training session for the other secretaries in the district. The other secretaries are largely using OpenOffice (NeoOffice, actually, since OO.org for OS X still isn’t where it needs to be). It’s also worth noting that these secretaries have quite a spectrum of abilities from quite proficient to looking for the “any key.”

The training session actually centered on our student information system, but touched on OpenOffice as a tool for manipulating data extracted from the SIS. Whether it was for a mail merge or simply easy sorting and reporting of various fields, Excel (and OpenOffice Calc) is a necessary tool in most secretaries’ bag of tricks.

Is OpenOffice good enough?

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