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“Can’t locate module” Error in Linux and Data Loss

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Howtos

When you start your Linux system, at boot time, the process may get terminated and you might come across with the following error message:“Can't Locate Module <module name>”After this error message, the system does not boot and none of your data can be accessed from it. CauseThis error message usually occurs if modprobe, rmmod, or insmod files are not able to find a module. Due to this, the system can not access the required system files to boot and thus shows the error message. è Modprobe- It is a system file that intelligently adds or removes the modules from the Linux kernel. It looks in module directory “/lib/modules/uname –r” for all modules and other files. è Insmod- It is a trivial tool for inserting a module in the Linux kernel. It takes the module from standard input. If this tool tries to link the modules inside the Linux kernel, the error messages are thrown. è Rmmod- It uploads the loadable modules from running Linux kernel. It tries to upload the set of modules from kernel, with restriction that they aren’t in use and that they aren’t referred to by other ones. These system files can’t perform their tasks if they are corrupted. The corruption could be due to virus attack, file system corruption, improper system shutdown and so on. ResolutionIn such critical situations, the only solution to work around this problem is to format the primary partition of your hard drive and reinstall the operating system. It will remove all the errors and will install a new set of data structures and a fresh Linux kernel. Though, formatting will remove the errors, but also delete the data stored on the primary partition. The situations can become worse if you have not partitioned your hard drive and stored all of precious data on it. In such circumstances, you need for a solution which can recover your lost data and can save you and your business. These solutions are available in the form of Linux recovery software. Linux data recovery software is the third party applications, specifically designed to meet different users’ data recovery requirements. The data recovery Linux software are easy to use and thus do not require any sound technical knowledge from user’s side. Stellar Phoenix Linux Data Recovery software is the best ever made and the most comprehensive Linux recovery software which carries out absolute data recovery Linux. You can use this software to perform Linux data recovery for all flavors and can recover all of sorts of lost files.

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