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9 tips for Ubuntu notebook users

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Ubuntu

Here are some tips for Ubuntu users who use notebook computers, including how to sync files effortlessly between a laptop and desktop, how to switch CPU speeds on the fly from the desktop, how to power-save your hard disk, and more. Only one or two are specific to notebooks so desktop users may find them interesting too.

All are taken from my brand new book Ubuntu Kung Fu, which contains over 300 other fun and useful tips for Ubuntu.

1. Slow Down a Touchpad’s Scrolling

If you have a notebook computer, you might be used to edge scroll on the touchpad when running Windows. This is where the right edge of the notebook’s touchpad is used as a virtual scrollbar—by running a finger up and down, the currently active window scrolls up and down correspondingly.

You might already have realized that you can activate the edge scroll functionality in Ubuntu using the Touchpad tab of System —> Preferences —> Mouse. The problem I had was that the scrolling was just too fast. A light touch on the pad caused the web page or file listing to fly up or down the screen. The solution was to add a line to the xorg.conf configuration file, as follows:

Open the Xorg configuration file into Gedit:

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