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PowerDVD Linux – expensive, but works

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PowerDVD Linux has been around for years. Originally sold only to embedded Linux developers, the software made its way onto the desktop by being included by hardware makers in Dell’s Ubuntu laptops and more recently Asus eeePCs. The software is now finally available to the general Ubuntu-using public via The Ubuntu Store.

As a rule, we generally don’t like a lot of proprietary software - not for any ethical reason, but because a lot of proprietary Linux apps are crap, with weird installers, no menu entries, EULAs in pop up terminals, and unnecessary requests to reboot.

On the other hand. Totem requires some setup (although it works out of the box if you use Ubuntu derivative Linux Mint) and at its best seems to use incorrect colors, giving a slightly yellowish tinge to the picture. MPlayer has a horrible UI, and frequently has issues with menus, chapters and subtitles.

We took a gamble and purchased on PowerDVD Linux. It’s expensive - $50 US (24 pounds UK) – and we were quite prepared to trash the software as publicly as we could if it failed to live up to expectations – which we expected it to do.

We were pleasantly surprised.

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