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Just what is up with PCLinuxOS anyway?

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PCLOS

PClinuxOS is a Linux distribution that gets mentioned quite a bit actually. It often is mentioned in the same breath and at the same table when we discuss the "big boy" or commercially supported distributions, like ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuse, etc...

This is pretty good when considering that PCLinuxOS is not commercially funded or supported in any way. Of course, they are not alone in that regard, Debian and Mint, Gentoo and others are not commercially supported either.

There is something about PCLinuxOS that keeps it at the forefront of discussion though. It has an appeal to many users and enjoys community support like only a few active distros ever see.

First of all, let's take it's basic position. At it's roots, the originator and lead developer of PCLinuxO, often known as "Texstar", did something that was a step away from most other distros.

He followed the advice that one should "do one thing and do it well".

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So what's the answer? What "is up" (if anything) with PCLinuxOS?

Did PCLinuxOS actually do something, or is this just more fluff and murmurs to fill in space since there is NEVER any official news or announcements from the home office?

Love that chatty home page with the April advertisement about LinPC taking top space over the oh so fresh May 2007 release announcement (slow down spam kings, two announcements in a year is just waaaaaay to much info overload!).

So how is that respin and/or new release coming? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?

Well, since you put it so

Well, since you put it so much without sarcasm, I'm sure the devs will rush right out to prove you wrong. Yeah right.

Interestingly enough, the article you're commenting on talks about people JUST LIKE YOU...who use sarcastic comments to bash pclinuxos because it doesn't release the latest and greatest. So, you proved the entire point of the article in one swoop. Congrats on walking into that one with open arms.

Insert_Ending_Here

re: well...

Oh yes, I'm sure those famously loquacious developers will break their long standing tradition of COMPLETE silence, and respond here (I knew I should have threw in some sycophantic fawning in there somewhere to lure them out of their caves).

Why should they, when they have a well trained entourage of apologists (like you) that leap forward and make excuses and platitudes for them?

I couldn't care less about the actual release schedule, I just find it incredibly stupid for such a seemingly popular distro to have such lame (or should I say nonexistent) communication skills.

What little info they do leak is never, ever, accurate (ohhhh, the repo's are frozen, new release is imminent, then several months of zip, zilch, nadda). Here's a concept - tell people where things ACTUALLY stand, make realistic time estimates, and then STICK TO THEM, or be transparent and vocal about why there are delays.

Not everyone is a drooling fanboy, so perhaps if they spent just a teeny tiny effort on doing some real PR, they might find they don't have so many people ragging on them all the time.

You are right. Not everyone

You are right. Not everyone is a "drooling fanboy" but the way you condescend to people, one would believe you think they are.

It must truly bother you to think that other people can be satisfied with the way things are currently working and not in uproar at what you perceive as something wrong.

Your opinion is well known because you never stop giving it.

We know now. you may rest.

Big Bear

Use what suites you best

Look... Let's stop bashing other Linux distros. The enemy is not other Linux flavors, but the proprietary establishment that seeks to empty our wallets with poor products, empty promises, terrible support, and strong arm tactics. The enemy is not Ubuntu, PCLinuxOS, Red Hat, Novell, or any other Linux distributor.

I'm an avid user of PCLinuxOS, and it doesn't disappoint me one bit. PCLinuxOS is a rolling release, so PCLinuxOS 2007 with all current updates will be the same as PCLinuxOS 2009, when it's released. The only difference will be the newer kernel on the 2009 release will enable users of newer hardware to boot the CD and install it, and there will be less downloading to get all the updates. My machine is an nForce 4 machine, so the 2007 CD boots just fine and runs flawlessly. The stability is rock solid, and they have all the packages I need. I'm a happy camper.

If you use Ubuntu, Suse, Fedora, Mandy, Debian, Sabayon, Gentoo, Slackware...or whatever other distro, and it works for you, then great! Just don't try to tear down the Linux movement from within. That's our biggest enemy...

BTW, Vonskippy...2009 is very close to release.

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