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Some things that bother me on open source/free software

Filed under
OSS

First I have to say i’m happy with openSUSE 11.0 (It’s best openSUSE ever). After that I have say then comes hardware problems on shiny new HP Proliant DL385GS (4 core AMD CPU).

Everything start on sunny day i’m happy installing openSUSE 11.0 from x84_86 DVD. Everything goes fine and smooth. Then I set up LTSP5 and it goes excelent (remember to remove pulseaudio from server to make it work wirth audio). Users starts to use LTSP5 and suddenly everything doesn’t go fine anymore. Machine crashes everytime they start to do something else than just login (open firefox crash, listen music crash or watch youtube guess what crash). Client keeps itself up but server goes down fast. No kernel panic nothing (Nothing on /var/log/message nor in dmesg)!

I called to HP just to hear awful news. openSUSE is not supported. Okay I understand they can’t support every distro on earth but Novell ain’t small player, openSUSE is quit popular. We can use SLES (this is not about money) but it’s too ancient for us. So we choose suffering!

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