Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Are Open Source Violations Lurking in Your Code?

Filed under

IT organizations that feel safe from open source licensing violations might be wise to check their code, as open source components are rapidly seeping into applications by way of offshore and in-house developers taking open source shortcuts, as well as a growing population of open source-savvy grads entering the workforce.

"With all of these new aspects, open source is something companies are going to have to get their heads around," says Anthony Armenta, vice president of engineering at Wyse Technology, a maker of thin clients.

It's not just about unearthing open source code that's in violation of licensing, either. Open source must be managed like any other software component, as security vulnerabilities arise and patches become available. Wyse has been using Palamida, which checks code bases against a 6TB library of known open source projects, fingerprints, and binary files, to track its open source usage for the past year.

Last year, Palamida added open source vulnerability alerts and other security-related features to its service. Today, the company announced both electronic delivery of vulnerability updates and unique identifiers to better manage open source code.

More Here

Had all s/w been free (libre)

Had all s/w been free (libre), this would not be an issue.

VMware: A "significant portion" of our technology may include open source

VMware seems to be dancing around the elephant in the room: its controversial use of Linux in its proprietary hypervisor technology. It's interesting that the company, which has refused to comment publicly on these specific allegations, is content to serve up a blanket advisory in its 10-Q.

If I were a VMware shareholder, I'd want clarity. The company suggests that it's complying with all open-source licenses, to the best of its knowledge. If this is true, it's perhaps time for the company to put those claims to a public sniff test.

The developer community hasn't been amused by VMware's use of embedded Linux in its hypervisor technology. Why not call out specifically why VMware feels it is in compliance with the GPL?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

IBM releases Power-based Linux servers with Nvidia GPUs

The Power Systems LC line was introduced by Dr Stefanie Chiras, director and business line executive of IBM scale-out Power Systems, as part of her keynote on the subject of 'waitless computing'. IBM, as a patron of the OpenPower Foundation, has been a staunch supporter of Linux and OpenStack, and this represents a logical step for the company, as it has been building its Power line following the sale of its x86 server business to Lenovo in 2014. Read more

What Are Linux Meta-packages?

I was recently in a discussion about meta-packages, and realized many users don’t know what they are or what they do. So, let’s see if we can clear-up the mystery. Meta-packages in a nutshell A ‘meta-package’ is a convenient way to bulk-install groups of applications, their libraries and documentation. Many Linux distributions use them for a variety of purposes, from seeding disk images that will go on to become new releases, to creating software “bundles” that are easy for a user to install. A meta-package rarely contains anything other than a changelog and perhaps copyright information, it contains no applications or libraries within itself. The way they work is by having a list of “dependencies” that the package manager reads. The package manager then goes to the repositories to find the dependencies and installs them. (Read the rest at Freedom Penguin)

Antenna recommendation

Astros vs Yankees Live Streaming