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Review: SUSE 10, on the Road

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SUSE

I'm on vacation this week. For me, though, vacation includes carrying around my Linux-powered laptop.

So while, you're going to have to wait for a while for my full review of SUSE 10, I had to let you know sooner than later about how SUSE 10 handles on the road.

Why? Because unlike most Linux desktop distributions, OpenSUSE and Novell's SUSE 10 works extremely well as a road warrior operating system.

Full Review.

Also on Linux-Watch:

My colleague, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, just posted a story praising a new Linux distribution from SuSE. After formatting the story, and posting it on the site, I read the story, and decided it might be fun to take a look.

I have not tried SuSE since about 1999. Back then, YaST was closed source, and seemingly every single configuration option lived in one enormous master configuration file somewhere in /etc. This all seemed very German, somehow. Very organized, and very large.

But ever since YaST went open source, the distribution seems to be taking over more and more of my friends' computers every year. Why not try it out again, I thought?

I got as far as the download page, where I was offered a choice of about half a dozen different SuSE 10 distributions. Some came from Novell, some from the OpenSuSE project, some were DVD-based, some were based on CDs. Hm, I thought. Is it finally time to see if the DVD burner in my little mini-ITX system can actually be made to work under Linux?

No, I decided, it's not. Why would anyone distribute an operating system on DVD, or even CD-ROM nowadays? It just doesn't make any sense. CDs are a throw-back to the era of boxed retail OS sets -- very 90s.

Installing Linux from a DVD is so... last decade.

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