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Writing a Program to Control OpenOffice.org

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OOo

In Part 1, we studied the fundamental concepts of OpenOffice.org's software development kit (SDK) and how the SDK can be used to communicate with the OOo programs. We now are ready to write an application. As previously stated, we are going to develop a program that is able to interact with OpenOffice.org's spreadsheet application, Calc. Two reasons are behind this choice. First, solving the problems raised in creating this program will acquaint us with many of the most important aspects of UNO (Universal Network Objects) programming. Second, spreadsheets allow users to build nice reports easily. If we are able to control a spreadsheet application, it can be turned into our personal report generator.

The code that will allow our application to work with Calc can be divided into six sections, each one with its own task:

  1. Connecting to OpenOffice.org

  2. Opening the document
  3. Choosing a worksheet
  4. Modifying the chosen worksheet
  5. Printing the worksheet
  6. Closing the connection

Part 1

Part 2.

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