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Dell Mini 9....

Filed under
Just talk

So, September the 4th saw the launch of the new Dell Mini 9 PC, which I placed and order on Dells website, paid my money, and even had a dell official call me at work, to check m Work address was where i wanted the device delivered to.. All very good service, and its at this point, over here in the UK, I see problems occuing.

First over here in the UK, there is/was one Dell option for £299 which came with the obligatory Windows XP loaded, and various blogs telling us the Ubuntu version will be available in 2 weeks. This is not good Dell, not good at all, why the need to wait 2 weeks, or as i have done, take the Redmond tax, knowing i'll format the hard disk within 30 seconds of ownership, to slap Ubuntu on it.

This is not the first issue, because for all their "releasing" the Products, and having only one option to purchase. I have to wait till 18th Sept till i get the unit. 2 weeks. Ouch, so why is this Dell? You have no customization available for the product, you can pretty much prebuild some get bums on seats who don't work for cnet or engadget using, and thus reviewing this device..

On the order site there are the following stages of the order

Phase 1 Order Processing Your order has completed this phase.
Phase 2 Pre-Production Your order has completed this phase.
Phase 3 In Production Your order is in this phase.
Phase 4 Delivery Preparation Ink cartridges and other small items are sent by post.
Laptops, desktops and other large items are delivered by our delivery partner.
Phase 5 Delivery You will be able to track the order with our delivery partner.

I'm 3 days after placing my order and at stage

Phase 3 In Production Your order is in this phase.

I fully appreciate that Dell are releasing thier device on the website as a "publicity stunt" however the lack of Ubuntu on Release really show their commitment to the product, and if i were Canonical, id be wondering why dells business model can't accommodate an Ubuntu option on all thier hardware. ITs not like their Windows support is great. I've been calling that for over 8 years and have to say its pretty abysmal level of support, with support reps unable to think outside the box. So why? is it an ageement with Redmond, who are desperately trying to claw back market share in the Netbook arena?

As long as the money keeps rolling in, i guess every one is happy, however if your after quick delivery, and Linux, mayb take a look at an Acer..

Recently Dell have announced that they will not stop selling XP, is this because Dell have agreed to give XP a head start on its new device?

I guess i'll get the device eventually...

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