Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Dell Mini 9....

Filed under
Just talk

So, September the 4th saw the launch of the new Dell Mini 9 PC, which I placed and order on Dells website, paid my money, and even had a dell official call me at work, to check m Work address was where i wanted the device delivered to.. All very good service, and its at this point, over here in the UK, I see problems occuing.

First over here in the UK, there is/was one Dell option for £299 which came with the obligatory Windows XP loaded, and various blogs telling us the Ubuntu version will be available in 2 weeks. This is not good Dell, not good at all, why the need to wait 2 weeks, or as i have done, take the Redmond tax, knowing i'll format the hard disk within 30 seconds of ownership, to slap Ubuntu on it.

This is not the first issue, because for all their "releasing" the Products, and having only one option to purchase. I have to wait till 18th Sept till i get the unit. 2 weeks. Ouch, so why is this Dell? You have no customization available for the product, you can pretty much prebuild some get bums on seats who don't work for cnet or engadget using, and thus reviewing this device..

On the order site there are the following stages of the order

Phase 1 Order Processing Your order has completed this phase.
Phase 2 Pre-Production Your order has completed this phase.
Phase 3 In Production Your order is in this phase.
Phase 4 Delivery Preparation Ink cartridges and other small items are sent by post.
Laptops, desktops and other large items are delivered by our delivery partner.
Phase 5 Delivery You will be able to track the order with our delivery partner.

I'm 3 days after placing my order and at stage

Phase 3 In Production Your order is in this phase.

I fully appreciate that Dell are releasing thier device on the website as a "publicity stunt" however the lack of Ubuntu on Release really show their commitment to the product, and if i were Canonical, id be wondering why dells business model can't accommodate an Ubuntu option on all thier hardware. ITs not like their Windows support is great. I've been calling that for over 8 years and have to say its pretty abysmal level of support, with support reps unable to think outside the box. So why? is it an ageement with Redmond, who are desperately trying to claw back market share in the Netbook arena?

As long as the money keeps rolling in, i guess every one is happy, however if your after quick delivery, and Linux, mayb take a look at an Acer..

Recently Dell have announced that they will not stop selling XP, is this because Dell have agreed to give XP a head start on its new device?

I guess i'll get the device eventually...

More in Tux Machines

Fanless network appliance runs Linux on Marvell Armada 370

Axiomtek’s fanless “NA150″ network appliance runs Linux on a Marvell Armada 370 SoC and offers five GbE ports, a 2.5-inch drive bay, and mini-PCIe wireless. The NA150 is latest addition to Axiomtek’s family of compact desktop and rack-mountable network appliances, but it appears to be the first to stray from the well-trodden x86 path. Unlike the company’s similar circa-2011 NA330 and NA320R systems, which were powered by Intel Atoms, the NA150 is built around Marvell’s ARMv7-based Armada 370 system-on-chip. Read more

Real pics of Samsung's clamshell Android with 16 MP camera emerge, flippin' awesome

Samsung's flip Android comes with two 3.9-inch Super AMOLED panels with 768 by 1280 pixels of resolution, both of them protected by layers of Corning's Gorilla Glass 4, which is the same ultra-resistant glass that you're going to find on high-end Samsung handsets such as the Galaxy Note5 or the Galaxy S6. The handset draws its processing power from the hexa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 chipset, a SoC that's paired with 2 GB of RAM. Read more

OpenBSD Is Getting Its Own Native Hypervisor

The OpenBSD Foundation has been funding work on a project to provide OpenBSD with its own, native hypervisor. The hypervisor's VMM is so far able to launch a kernel and ask for a root file-system, but beyond that, it's been laying most of the hypervisor foundation up to this point. Read more

The Death of Ubuntu's Software Center

Over the past few weeks, the fate of Ubuntu's Software Center has received a lot of press. There have been ample ravings about how the Software Center is about to vanish from the face of the Earth. In reality, it's not going anywhere yet. What is changing, however, will be the ability to submit new applications or updates to existing applications. In this article, I'll explain what this means and where things will likely go from here. Read more