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Kick Linux To The Curb?

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Linux

Recently I found myself presented with the possibility of switching to Apple's OS X. Keeping in mind that I already have a Mac in our home in the form of my wife's computer, the idea of me using it did get me thinking. What would it take for me to completely abandon Linux and return to the world of closed source operating systems?

After much consideration, I have managed to put together a list of things I would need in order to subject myself once again to the annoying and often restrictive world of closed source computing.

1. Availability.

I have no problem paying a reasonable price for use of my operating system. This being a flat fee or even a monthly subscription. But when I pay the bills, I expect to have access to it as I see fit. This means access to download and burn DVD ISOs when I want. At the same time, being able to purchase it from a store would be nice, but is not critical for me personally. I can always order a copy of the DVD/CD online if I need packaging for that matter.

2. No activation keys or serial numbers.

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