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Faqs! Facts! Fax! Windows XP vs Linux

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Q. I have an AMD computer, which I set up to dual boot to Windows or Ubuntu Linux until I rashly tried to install XP Service Pack 3. It went well at first but the computer rebooted before completion and the promised safeguard of a System Restore failed to work, leaving a blank screen and no error message. I am forced to use the power switch at the wall socket to reboot.

Do I now have to reinstall Windows XP (and Ubuntu) or if there are ways of retrieving files from the Windows partition using Linux. At present Ubuntu indicates the HDD cannot be mounted but gives an example of a forced option. Do you think this would work or just make the situation worse?

To be honest I find Linux systems more interesting (and this one very stable) so maybe after following Bill Gates through different versions of DOS to Windows is it time, like him, to leave?
Mike Cheshire, via email

Q. I am very pleased with my Asus Eee; Linux entails a bit of a learning curve but reasonably easy to master. I have installed the 'Advanced' KDE desktop and am pleased with the way it is running, apart from one small niggle. When I open File Manager my Windows home network icon is not shown. I have to first open the Administrator File Manager terminal and click on the MS Home icon. The icon is then visible in the previous terminal. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Ted Wooller, via email

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