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Opening the box: The story of the Pandora (so far)

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Gaming

Open source handhelds have been with us for a while now. Those of you with a decent memory will recall the excellent GP2X from Korean manufacturer Gamepark Holdings, a device capable of performing numerous different functions, the most appealing of which is the ability to emulate several retro gaming platforms such as the Mega Drive, NES and PC Engine. Owning such a machine is like having an entire video game collection in your pocket.

Sadly, production of the GP2X has now ceased, and this has understandly led many fans to ponder what machine they should consider next. With this in mind, we spoke to Craig Rothwell, the official UK distributor of the GP2X (and its upcoming successor, The Wiz) about why he's helping to produce what will arguably be the biggest rival to these machines: the Pandora.

Pocket Gamer: Can you explain how the Pandora came about?

Craig Rothwell: Well, almost all of the open devices of this nature come from Asia and they are not made by gamers or people who are into the computer scene; they are seen as a cash cow to sell to wacky westerners. The problem here is that the attention to detail is poor.

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