Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Will the real XML please stand up!

Filed under

We live in a world of false superlatives. Every damn new thing is the latest, greatest, fastest, etc. Then you bring your bright shiny new widget home from the store, and maybe it works great for about 5 minutes before falling apart. Nowhere has this disappoint been greater than in the world of computers. So we have become jaded.

Time to lose your funk. Web 2.0 is on the way, and the Open Document format is the horse that it will be riding in on, and the name of that horse is 2.0 stable version. (Plus the LAMPPP stack. Okay, so Web 2.0 will have more than one horse). Very soon, Joe Sixpack will have a more viable alternative to the Microsoft Office for performing one of the most important, if mundane, functions of desktop computing anywhere, anytime, on any desktop. Word processing. Spreadsheets. Presentations. All free as in beer, and free as in freedom. And while Google it is not actually clear to what extent Google will be providing access to over the web, it is very clear that the clean XML upon which 2.0 is based will allow interoperability among modular, loosely coupled disparate computer systems through of service-oriented architectures (SOAs) in ways that we can now only begin to imagine.

Think SOA is just a boring acronym? Think again. SOA is what the collaboration of Web 2.0 is all about. As Kevin Kelley said in a recent Wired article, the Internet is probably going to become the first form of artificial intelligence. You will soon be able to share data generated 50 years ago across computing applications that are being written today. The possibilities are staggering.

Uncle Vic, the scowling Mad Penguin™ mascot, is so pumped about this new development that Mad Penguin™ will be running a series of three interviews with people who are in the trenches in the work to bring out OOo 2.0. The first of these interviews, with Florian Reuter, covers some of the differences between the truly open XML found in OOo 2.0, and the closed MS Word ML found in the upcoming Microsoft Office 12, as well as the importance of simple end users in the process of improving the code with bug reports.

OOo 2.0 is really different from Microsoft Office in a way that makes a difference. Be sure to check back here with Mad Penguin™ as we approach the formal release of the stable version of OOo 2.0 to find out more about where this powerful new office suite is going, and how it will change the way that humanity communicates.


More in Tux Machines

Linux/FOSS Events

  • FOSDEM Desktops DevRoom 2016 all for Participation
    FOSDEM is one of the largest (5,000+ hackers!) gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium, Europe). Once again, one of the tracks will be the Desktops DevRoom (formerly known as “CrossDesktop DevRoom”), which will host Desktop-related talks. We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-source Software on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applications and interoperability amongst Desktop Environments. This is a unique opportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.
  • LatinoWare
    Yesterday, Wednesday 19 oct, was the first day of LatinoWare thirteen edition hosted in the city of Foz do Iguaçu in Parana state with presence of 5155 participants and temperature of 36ºC. Currently this is the biggest event of free software in Brazil.
  • Attending a FUDcon LATAM 2016
    From my experience I will share my days at FUDcon 2016 held on Puno last week. There were 3 core days, and 2 more days to visit around.

Linux Graphics

Games for GNU/Linux

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Patches Updated For Linux 4.9
    Intel has updated its currently out-of-tree Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0 patches for compatibility against the Linux 4.9-rc1 kernel plus made other improvements to the code. These patches have been worked on the past few months after Intel PR initially claimed no TBM 3.0 Linux support. The patches have gone through several public revisions but sadly didn't make it for integration into the mainline Linux 4.9 kernel.
  • Linux 4.9 Is Showing A Performance Boost On More Systems
    Earlier this week I posted some benchmarks of a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E system seeing performance boosts under Linux 4.9 and it turns out it's looking more widespread than just affecting a niche system or two. When testing a more traditional Intel Haswell desktop, Linux 4.9 Git is seeing more wins over Linux 4.8 and 4.7 kernels. Following that earlier 4.9 Git benchmarking I set out to do a fairly large Linux kernel comparison on a Haswell system to go back three or so years worth of kernel releases. That big kernel comparison will be finished up and posted in the days ahead, but already from this Core i7 4790K Devil's Canyon system I am seeing some performance improvements with 4.9 Git to share over 4.7.0 and 4.8.0 stock kernels...
  • Linux Foundation Welcomes JavaScript Community
    Kris Borchers, executive director of the foundation, announced the news, saying that the JavaScript Foundation aims "to support a vast array of technologies that complement projects throughout the entire JavaScript ecosystem." This includes both client and server side application libraries, mobile application testing frameworks, and JavaScript engines. All jQuery Foundation projects will also be united within the JS Foundation including jQuery, Lodash, ESLint, Esprima, Grunt, RequireJS, jQuery UI, Globalize, Sizzle, Jed, and Dojo.