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Nintendo sets Revolution launch price at $99?

Filed under
Gaming

The latest Nintendo Revolution rumor to hit the web is a doozie… “Nintendo may be aiming for a $99 launch price.” Yeah, it’s a dirty rumor, but could it be done? Doing so would put the Revolution in a league of its own, practically excusing it from the next-gen battle—it simply wouldn’t be competing with the Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3 if it were wearing a $99 price tag.

We’re likely going to see a lot of these rumors popping up in the coming months. Some suggest that rumors like this might be motivated by a desire to discourage prospective Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 buyers. Needless to say, we should take this rumor—and the ones to follow—with a grain of salt.

Update: it’s also important to remember that Nintendo doesn’t sell its consoles at a loss. If a $99 Revolution is a real possibility, we can expect the system to be only a fraction as powerful as the PlayStation 3 or Xbox 360.

Source.

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