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Windows Security vs. Linux Security

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OS

If you’ve switched to Ubuntu from Windows, there’s a very good chance that the security failings of Windows featured in your decision. By any measure, Microsoft’s record on security within its products is appalling. A new and serious security warning appears seemingly on an ongoing basis, and a new and devastating virus makes news headlines with similar frequency (usually described as “a PC virus” rather than what it actually is: a Windows virus).

One argument is that Windows is the target of so many viruses merely because it’s so popular. Although it’s true that some of the underground crackers who write viruses dislike Microsoft, there’s also little doubt that Windows has more than its fair share of security issues.

The situation is certainly getting better but, even so, Microsoft’s latest operating system, provides many good examples of why it’s an easy target. Upon installation, the default user is given root powers.

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