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PCLinuxOS Magazine August 2008 Released

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PCLinuxOS Magazine, August 2008 (Issue 24) is available to download.

Some highlights include:

1. Linux Media Players - Part 1
2. How to change your localization
3. Alphabet of programming languages
4. Chapter 4 - Kde User Guide
5. And more...

PDF Version August 2008 (Issue 24)

HTML Version August 2008 (Issue 24)


Ironic that they have a spin off distro that's tweaked for Archaeologists (ya know, cause in another month or two their 2007 release will be a fossil).

//or did I miss the announcement from the committee that formed a group that put together a team who are discussing the strategy to create a todo list that will outline the possibility that might lead to some mystery person (or persons) to respin their existing distro?

//no worries, I'm sure there will be plenty of fans that jump in and apologize, or make excuses, or explain how easy I could do it myself, or otherwise flame me for having a legitimate comment on a easily fixed yet hem hawed to death problem.

No flame at all

Since PCLinuxOS is a rolling release distro, even the 2007 release is completely up to date to the forthcoming 2008/2009 release, as long as one updates the kernel as well. The only difference will be for users of newer hardware that will require a newer kernel to get the CD to boot on the new hardware. This will be remedied by two things, very shortly: an updated 2007 ISO, followed by the new 2008/2009 (depending on how soon it's finished) release. It doesn't affect the current users at all.

Texstar and the Ripper Gang insist on quality over release speed, and currently, from what I understand, there is a problem with a certain package they need to get ironed out to ship a new release and it's a problem that hasn't been solved, yet. A shipping full version of PCLinuxOS is always about as stable and solid as can be, and most users of it won't have it any other way. Why be like Mandriva, Suse, and Ubuntu and ship broken releases?


I bought a newer motherboard on a whim a couple of weeks ago, namely an ASUS M2N-VM-DVI. Installed it on my secondary (experimental) box with new RAM (it has integrated NVIDIA GeForce 7050PV video) and an Athlon 64 dual core 6000+ CPU. After some trial and error, I discover that I can't install linux from an optical drive when the installer runs a linux kernel version older than 2.6.25.

Of course, the download version of PCLinuxOS 2007 has a kernel version 2.6.18. What to do?

On my work computer, I have PCLOS installed, and I had just installed/updated to kernel 2.6.26dev4 from the PCLOS repositories (kernel is experimental/testing version, but it seems to work well), so using your howto for the "remasterme" program, I build a 3.5GB ISO with this new kernel, burn it to DVD, and use it to install PCLOS on the ASUS M2N-VM-DVI box. Problem solved--works great!

OK then - nevermind

Ok my bad (silly me thinking the VENDOR would actually keep their release semi-current -- yes, yes, I know they're going to respin it any day now -- at least that's what they've been saying for several months).

So "all" I have to do is get a older computer, install the original PCLINUXOS2007, download and install about 9 bazillion megs worth of updates and patches, reboot, then follow the respin "remasterme" howto, then create a huge new ISO, then burn ISO #2 to disk, then get my new computer, and then install my custom ISO of PCLINUXOS2007.

How silly of me to think that was toooooo much work.

Obviously not a solution for you.

vonskippy--I certainly didn't intend my comment as a proposed solution for you. I merely wanted to thank ruel24 for his howto on remasterme, and point out this method for users wanting to install PCLOS on both old and new boxes. This thread just seemed a convenient place to share this technique. It's why I replied to ruel24, and not you.

Insofar as your valuable work/effort time goes, anyone spending time installing and using Linux Mint (an Ubuntu derivative no less) as you once confessed to doing . . . well, 'nuff said.

slow sunday

gfranken wrote:
anyone spending time installing and using Linux Mint (an Ubuntu derivative no less) as you once confessed to doing . . . well, 'nuff said.

Hangs head in shame, scuffs feet, tears well up in the corner of my eyes.....

//got me there - I'm still running Minty 5 on my primary laptop (but I'm not proud of it - well actually it's surprisingly Minty freshtastic).

//no biggy on the PCLOS debacle, I just hate it when people say they will do something "soon" and it drags on for months and months (besides, for the moment, I've run out of Unoobtu cracks).

How many Unoobtuers . . .

Question: How many Unoobtuers does it take to screw in a light bulb?

Answer: 3001. One to twist in the light bulb, and 3000 to blog about this wonderful "new technique".

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