Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Death of a filesystem (?)

Filed under
Reiser

Over the last months there were repeating news about the murder on Nina Reiser by her husband Hans Reiser, known in the community for his work on his filesystems ReiserFS and Reiser4.

In this post I don't want to deal with the murder, the process or the conviction, there are lots of news and posts about this all over the net, and in at least some cases written by people who are a lot more competent in that field than I am.

What I want to deal with here are the consequences of this "story" that may be in store for Reiser's filesystems.

ReiserFS seems to have caused quite a few heated discussions on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (Archive: http://www.lkml.org). Obviously enough that Hans Reiser sees the main reason for Reiser4 not being transferred into the main kernel-tree in people simply not liking him.

How much of this is true or not shall not be matter of this post, and anyway I am not in the position to judge about this. But it seems to be quite a fact that Reiser didn't make himself very popular with the code he submitted. The problem was, as far as I remember, that it was written without following any kernel-coding-standards.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Why I fought for open source in the Air Force

I wanted an open source solution and faced a fair amount of resistance from our lawyers, management, users, and proprietary vendors. It was a difficult struggle at times, and it wasn't until the DoD published their first official guidance on the use of open source software that we started to gain traction. Finally, in the middle of all of the drama, the DoD leadership issued a policy update explicitly stating that open source software was acceptable as long as there was support for it, and that the support could come in the form of government programmers, if necessary. This memo was a game changer, but it took more than just a policy update to get momentum to shift toward open source. Read more

Android-x86 4.4-r5 Might Be the Last Release in the Android 4.4 "KitKat" Series

We reported two weeks ago that the Android-x86 4.4-r4 might just be the last in the Android 4.4 KitKat-based series of the Linux distribution, but it looks like the developers have decided to make one more maintenance release. Read more

Gorgeous Birdie 2.0 Twitter Client for Linux Is Now Available for Beta Testing

Remember when we told you that the developers of the excellent Birdie Twitter client for GNU/Linux operating system announced that they would start work on the next major release, version 2.0, but only for elementary OS? Read more

Linux 4.5-rc3

It's Sunday afternoon, and everything is normal. And that means that there's a new rc release right on time. It's slightly bigger than I'd like, but not excessively so (and not unusually so). Most of the patches are pretty small, although the diff is utterly dominated by the (big) removal a couple of staging rdma drivers that just weren't going anywhere. Those removal patches are 90% of the bulk of the diff. Read more