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Red Hat Enterprise Linux Receives Department of Defense IPv6 Certification

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Linux

Red Hat today announced that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 has received Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Special Interoperability Certification from the Defense Information System Agency (DISA) in accordance with the Department of Defense (DoD) IPv6 Master Test Plan.

The certification demonstrates Red Hat’s ongoing commitment to meeting the growing demands of government agencies and enterprises as they adapt to the next-generation Internet.

The DoD IPv6 product certification program began as a mandate from the DoD’s CIO and Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration (ASD-NII) who targeted FY08 as a target IPv6 transition completion date for the DoD. The IPv6 Special Interoperability Certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 was conducted by the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC), which evaluates vendor products and DoD systems as IPv6 Capable.

With the certification, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 has been certified for the DoD’s Unified Capabilities Approved Products List (UC APL) for an IPv6 capable Host and Workstation and IPv6 capable Advanced Server. The certification ensures that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.2 meets the DoD’s set of mandated requirements, appropriate to its Product Class, necessary for it to interoperate with other IPv6 products employed in DoD IPv6 networks.

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