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Linux on desktop is a diverse market - really

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Linux

Don't expect hegemony from a single Linux vendor on the desktop comparable with Microsoft's Office, as rival frameworks and implementations tackle different markets.

That's according to Red Hat fellow Alan Cox, who said research indicates users are adopting KDE and Gnome to serve different scenarios. He added that business users are less interested in the technical aspects of their desktops than technology experts, and simply want something that's familiar, reliable and comes at a low cost.

Cox, speaking at LinuxWorld in London, said the slowly growing market for Linux desktops is largely dominated by Gnome and KDE. Evidence from different reports suggests KDE is more widely used in Europe and Gnome in the US.

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