Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Bruce Perens: Microsoft and Apache - What's the Angle?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

For a decade, Microsoft was open source's worst enemy, combating it at every turn. But last week Microsoft joined the Apache open source project as a platinum sponsor, promising to put $100,000 per year into a project that beats its own IIS (Internet Information Services) in the market. Microsoft also made some of their patents available for use in GPL software like Linux without a royalty. Has Redmond given up the fight? Or is this just their latest strategy?

Years of Ill Will

Just a few years ago, Microsoft exec Jim Allchin called open source "an intellectual-property destroyer, I can't imagine something that could be worse than this for the software business and the intellectual-property business." Craig Mundie called it unhealthy and economicaly unsound." But that was the old Microsoft, not the new cute one with an Apache feather in their hair and Bill Gates gone forever.

Now they just want to interoperate, right?

Wrong. You wouldn't have to look too far to convince yourself that Microsoft still engages in hard-edged fighting against open source. The Office Open XML standard has recently been pushed through ISO with so many irregularities in process that four nations complained. There already was an ISO-accredited office document standard called OpenDocument, created by the OpenOffice team. It was one-tenth the size of Microsoft's effort, and did the same work. But it would have put Microsoft and open source on an equal footing. Office Open XML, in contrast, is 6,000 pages long, so large that it's not possible for a programmer to learn it in his or her useful lifetime. That'll keep the open source folks from ever handling files quite the same way that Microsoft does.

So much for interoperability.




Where is the truth.....

For one this is, I think a very good article... But as always there is the premise of the bad and the ugly and the last good hero... There is no such... Open Source has established his foothold in the IT bussinnes, that is a fact. And I think stopping shouting around "we are here, we can do that also, we are better" becomes really obsolete, because as a fact the market share for Open Source is slowly overshadowing the MS bussinnes model and paradigm. He is crazy, you tell to your self. No I am not... There is one real good sentence and as such it is the abosolute truth

...Microsoft's proprietary software paradigm focuses on the sales of software instead of the much larger economic value of using software....

Look at Vista, you buy it, you use it, it breaks (oh it realy can and will), if you call the MS hotline and you have OEM, response is please contact your hardware reseller or you have a full package hmm try to reinstall the system... People MS does everything that you can not use his own OS.... The MS support lost definitely touch with us the people. It functions in terms of big and bigger... As the fact you can not use the OS, you bought it, payed for it, but you can not use it. Damm, so where do we look now, there is Apple nice, beautifull shiny, but with restrictions hard as MS, and there is the Open Source world, ready to burst with visions, power, inovations pushing the terms of using and supporting to much wider and higher degree and scale... Yes they are Big firms like IBM, Sun, Novell, Dell and more, which understood that, they naturally play a two face game.. Yes that true but slowly they understood you can give (give not sell...) the people an "unperfect" piece of software, so they can use it, test it, and patch it, but you give them the free or buy support alternative, not just contact there or reinstall the OS and you see.... Dell made firmware for his ntbs with nvidia also for Linux users.... http://liquidat.wordpress.com/2008/08/01/howto-updating-dell-firmware-on-linux/....
You bought the ntb with Linux so there is the support not just call nvidia or contact mr. Torvalds he will make it into the new kernel version... This the future... This were Open Source shines it is its flexibility, many eyes see better then few... And the good news is you can make money with it... No just, we sell you a broken piece of code and you can wait until we decide is broken and need to be repaired...

MS must face the truth, the old times begin to fade... With Google on the Web...the Pinguin poking from every hole, looking strait into the eyes of the old slowly teethless shark Smile O yes the is the Mojave Experiment.... nice try MS, but as always the objectivity of it is a completely different story....

P.S. sorry for long a not so good english at 11.30p.m. Slovakia/Europe I am tired, but I had to shout it... howk...

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

Security News

  • Hacking the American College Application Process
    In recent years, foreign students have streamed into American universities, their numbers nearly doubling in the last decade. About half of all international students are coming from Asian countries, many of which have been subject to heavy recruitment from American colleges. Taking advantage of the popularity of an American education, a new industry has sprung up in East Asia, focused on guiding students through the U.S. college application process with SAT preparation courses, English tutors and college essay advisors. But not all college prep companies are playing by the rules. In their investigative series for Reuters, a team of reporters found that foreign companies are increasingly helping students game the U.S. college application process. Some companies have leaked questions from college entrance exams to their students before they take the test. Others have gone so far as to ghostwrite entire college applications and complete coursework for students when they arrive on campus. We spoke with Steve Stecklow, one of the reporters on the team, about what they uncovered.
  • illusive networks' Deceptions Everywhere
    illusive networks' bread and butter is its deception cybersecurity technology called Deceptions Everywhere whose approach is to neutralize targeted attacks and Advanced Persistent Threats by creating a deceptive layer across the entire network. By providing an endless source of false information, illusive networks disrupts and detects attacks with real-time forensics and without disruption to business.
  • Mozila Offers Free Security Scanning Service: Observatory
    With an eye toward helpiing administrators protect their websites and user communities, Mozilla has developed an online scanner that can check if web servers have optimal security settings in place. It's called Observatory and was initially built for in-house use, but it may very well be a difference maker for you. "Observatory by Mozilla is a project designed to help developers, system administrators, and security professionals configure their sites safely and securely," the company reports.

Games for GNU/Linux

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Flatpak Universal Linux Package Supports Local Path References for Git Sources
    Alex Larsson from the Flatpak project has announced the release of a new maintenance update to the universal binary package format for Linux kernel-based operating systems. Flatpak 0.6.9 is now the latest version, and it promises to add many great enhancements, among which we can mention the ability to pass partial references every time a terminal command takes a runtime or application name, as well as a brand new command called build-commit-from. Application developers who want to package their apps and distribute it in the Flatpak format can use the above-mentioned command for creating new commits based on the contents of an existing commit, which can be from another local repository or a remote one.
  • Multiple vulnerabilities in RPM – and a rant
    Last year in November I decided that it might be a good idea to fuzz the parsers of package management tools in Linux distributions. I quickly found a couple of issues in DPKG and RPM. For DPKG the process went very smooth. I reported them to Debian's security team, eight days later fixes and security advisories were published by both Debian and Ubuntu, the main distributions using DPKG. For RPM the process was a bit more difficult.
  • Commvault announces support for Red Hat Virtualisation 4
    Back-up and archive specialist CommVault has announced support for Red Hat Virtualisation 4, the open source company's kernel-based virtual machine powered virtualisation platform. Red Hat Virtualisation 4 is built on the company's enterprise Linux distribution. It provides a centralised management platform for both Linux- and Windows-based workloads.
  • Zacks Assigns Rating To Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • GSoC Wrap Up
    GSoC 2016 finished last week and i am writing this blog to list the work done by me in last three months for Fedora. My project was to adjust pagure and write script(s) so that we can have pkgs.fedoraproject.org on a pagure instance.