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Ultamatix may be a worthy successor to Automatix

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Software

Some Ubuntu fans out there may remember Automatix, a tool for Ubuntu that allowed easy access to many popular non-free applications and commonly-used audio and video codecs. It debuted a few years ago, and got negative reviews from Ubuntu developers and experienced users due to the risk of breaking dependencies, but it offered an easy solution for beginners who weren't familiar with the way deb packages worked. Automatix was discontinued in March, when its developers moved on to other projects. Now Ultamatix hopes to continue where Automatix left off.

Ultamatix 1.8.0 was released in July, 2008, with versions available for Ubuntu 8.04, Ubuntu Ultimate Edition 1.8, and Debian Unstable. Both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures are supported. Linux newcomers will be pleased to know that installation of Ultamatix is purely point-and-click. It doesn't require the use of terminal commands unless you don't have a graphical deb package handler installed on your system. For most configurations, all you have to do is download the deb package, double-click it, and follow the prompts. An icon for Ultamatix will then appear in your Gnome or KDE applications menu.

When you first start Ultamatix, you must accept the license agreement, because the codecs it installs are not legal in all parts of the world. It's up to you to be aware of the laws in your country. Ultamatix developers take no responsibility for any lawbreaking you do with their software.

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