Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Meet Komodo Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Komodo Linux is a livecd based on PCLinuxOS remastered for personal and business needs of the developer. Perhaps more a learning project than anything, Komodo was released to the public and official version 1.0 is expected within weeks. Komodo is another on Distrowatch's waiting list, so come with us as we meet Komodo and speak with developer Simon Foote. Customized graphics, software additions, and a few other changes might inspire you to remaster a livecd for your own uses.

The developer, Simon Foote, first began his project as a learning experience. He states, "my goal was to learn how to remaster a new distro. if i can do it anyone could, plus i can personalise linux for users and company's as a business offering." He continues, "additionally i needed to practise project management and software testing techniques etc."

When asked why remaster PCLOS Simon answered, "because that distro is good to remaster. it is a lot easier than Deb or others I looked into."

So what we have is another fine PCLOS based livecd with a few added applications for consideration. First up is added samba server tools to enable windows integration.



The developer states, "I changed the file mounting to supermount so i could auto-mount stuff (and) I added a project management tool."

In addition, upgraded is OpenOffice.org 1.4 on PCLOS .91 to 1.9 on Komodo.

Let's not overlook the customized graphics. A new wallpaper, start button, kdm chooser, and kde splash feature everyone's favorite dragon Konqui charging in to guide you around your desktop.

Of course being based on PCLOS, you still have available all the start cheat codes and wonderful tools to which you may have become accustomed such as the PCLinuxOS Control Center, unique hard drive installer, and other applications. Full Komodo Linux rpmlist is here.

        


In conclusion, Komodo is a wonderful remaster featuring some thoughtful additions and customizations that might interest you. The project could also help one learn the ins and outs of remastering a livecd for personal uses, as the developer is friendly and accessible for questions. Simon says, "if i were to give someone a single piece of advice it would be this: go ahead and give it a shot with a distro that you like. PCLOS was one i loved. I might try a Deb flavor next time though. just for learning."

Official version 1.0 will be available probably within the month, but you may download release candidate 3 from this link.

More in Tux Machines

NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions. Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”. The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”. Read more

What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point. Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux. Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development. "We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said. Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations. Read more

Arch-based Linux distro KaOS 2014.08 is here with KDE 4.14.0

The Linux desktop community has reached a sad state. Ubuntu 14.04 was a disappointing release and Fedora is taking way too long between releases. Hell, OpenSUSE is an overall disaster. It is hard to recommend any Linux-based operating system beyond Mint. Even the popular KDE plasma environment and its associated programs are in a transition phase, moving from 4.x to 5.x. As exciting as KDE 5 may be, it is still not ready for prime-time; it is recommended to stay with 4 for now. Read more

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

One problem with Linux has been its implementation of system calls. As Andy Lutomirski pointed out recently, it's very messy. Even identifying which system calls were implemented for which architectures, he said, was very difficult, as was identifying the mapping between a call's name and its number, and mapping between call argument registers and system call arguments. Some user programs like strace and glibc needed to know this sort of information, but their way of gathering it together—although well accomplished—was very messy too. Read more