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Meet Komodo Linux

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Linux
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Komodo Linux is a livecd based on PCLinuxOS remastered for personal and business needs of the developer. Perhaps more a learning project than anything, Komodo was released to the public and official version 1.0 is expected within weeks. Komodo is another on Distrowatch's waiting list, so come with us as we meet Komodo and speak with developer Simon Foote. Customized graphics, software additions, and a few other changes might inspire you to remaster a livecd for your own uses.

The developer, Simon Foote, first began his project as a learning experience. He states, "my goal was to learn how to remaster a new distro. if i can do it anyone could, plus i can personalise linux for users and company's as a business offering." He continues, "additionally i needed to practise project management and software testing techniques etc."

When asked why remaster PCLOS Simon answered, "because that distro is good to remaster. it is a lot easier than Deb or others I looked into."

So what we have is another fine PCLOS based livecd with a few added applications for consideration. First up is added samba server tools to enable windows integration.



The developer states, "I changed the file mounting to supermount so i could auto-mount stuff (and) I added a project management tool."

In addition, upgraded is OpenOffice.org 1.4 on PCLOS .91 to 1.9 on Komodo.

Let's not overlook the customized graphics. A new wallpaper, start button, kdm chooser, and kde splash feature everyone's favorite dragon Konqui charging in to guide you around your desktop.

Of course being based on PCLOS, you still have available all the start cheat codes and wonderful tools to which you may have become accustomed such as the PCLinuxOS Control Center, unique hard drive installer, and other applications. Full Komodo Linux rpmlist is here.

        


In conclusion, Komodo is a wonderful remaster featuring some thoughtful additions and customizations that might interest you. The project could also help one learn the ins and outs of remastering a livecd for personal uses, as the developer is friendly and accessible for questions. Simon says, "if i were to give someone a single piece of advice it would be this: go ahead and give it a shot with a distro that you like. PCLOS was one i loved. I might try a Deb flavor next time though. just for learning."

Official version 1.0 will be available probably within the month, but you may download release candidate 3 from this link.

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