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PCLOS 2007.1 Soon, Followed by PCLOS 2008

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PCLOS

Good news to Linux Desktop Users! Tex and Ripper Gang will be offer PCLinuxOS 2007.1 soon followed by PCLinuxOS 2008. Now no more downloading of more than 400MB software after installing PCLinuxOS 2007.

PCLinuxOS 2007.1 will sport 2.6.24 kernel and latest stable packages from the repository. This release will have more drivers for the latest notebooks and desktops. The name "2007.1" does not seem fitting in the year "2008," but it is good as an update to 2007 release, and there will be totally new 2008 version with much makeover and features.

bit more here




re: PCLOS 2007.1

So it that the standard "soon" used by most humans, or is that the Duke Nukem Forever "soon" that they've been spouting for almost two years or so?

That would be the "There

That would be the "There shall be no wine before it's time" soon.

Which is fine.

Bad Analogy

Bad analogies are like a leaky screwdriver.

Wine has a very refined (or should that be defined) time line, and that definitely doesn't not describe PCLinuxOS 2007 and it's respin rumours.

picky picky

picky picky

Quote:So it that the

Quote:
So it that the standard "soon" used by most humans, or is that the Duke Nukem Forever "soon" that they've been spouting for almost two years or so?

ah, that'll be the two years discounting pclos 2007 or are some of us using a different calendar? I'm sure it is only 2008 now..... Seems you are on the dukenukem standard, hmmm?
Pclos 2007 was a big leap forward from .93a and the standard involved was worth the wait.
Using minime just now and it is different from the standard 2007. I'm prepared to wait.

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