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Recuperating an old Thinkpad - Part 1

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Linux

I bought my Thinkpad in 2001. It’s an i series 1300 and it came with modest configuration. For most of its lifetime, it has run Windows XP. My Thinkpad began to show signs of aging in 2006. I decided to try out Kubuntu.

In April 2007, I read an article in the Inquirer, that no Linux kernel, newer that 2.6.15 would ever work on an i series Thinkpad. I thought my days of experimenting with Linux were over and I decided to try explore the world of BSD, as suggested by the author of that article.

Since the beginning of 2008, I was trying unsuccessfully to get another operating system installed. I began with PC-BSD, then I tried Ubuntu, Suse, Fedora, Puppy Linux, Damn Small Linux, Debian, Gentoo and Arch Linux.

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