Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

thoughts on innovation on the desktop

Filed under
KDE

While surfing around on Teh Intarwebs, I've read complaints from people that we're doing something radically new to the user. Some of those users seem to have problems with all that "radically new" stuff. Honestly, I don't think they have seen anything we *can* do yet. With KDE 4.1, we have pretty much implemented functionality that was there, made applications smarter, and polished the looks. Almost all of the work on the UI, especially in Plasma has been put into recreating functionality from KDE 3.5. What is so radically new to it?

Having a shallow look, both -- KDE3 and KDE 4.1 have quite a similar interface. Panel with tasks in it, an application starter menu, a simple clock with a calendar, a virtual desktop switcher and the systray. Just about everything is in the same place where people using KDE 3 used to find it. And in 4.1, you'll have icon groups on your desktop that work just like kdesktop's filemanager, only a bit more flexible. Overall nice improvements, but certainly nothing radically new as a whole. That's probably as far as it can get with re-creating the traditional desktop. Nobody wants to create an exact copy of KDE 3 at this point anyway. If we would have wanted that, we wouldn't have started this journey that is KDE4.

Yet nobody wants to take away the traditional desktop from the users. That's why KDE 4.1 looks like it is.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Kubuntu 16.10 Finally Gets a Public Release, Beta 2 Uses KDE Plasma 5.7 Desktop

Earlier today, September 28, 2016, Canonical announced the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Final Beta, which is also the Beta 2 snapshot for some of the opt-in flavors, including Kubuntu. Read more

Black Panther OS Is No Cool Cat

Installation requires at least 10 GB of hard drive space and 1.5 GB memory. Normally, those requirements are not an issue. It becomes one, however, when installing to a virtual machine. Avoid two annoyances with installing Black Panther OS. The cancel/next buttons on the bottom of the screen did not show until I narrowed the height of the panel bar. Read more

Tiny, open, $18 quad-core SBC has WiFi, BT, eMMC, microSD

FriendlyARM’s 40 x 40mm “NanoPi Neo Air” hacker SBC runs Ubuntu Core on an Allwinner H3 with 8GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, a DVP cam connector, and a microSD slot. The NanoPi Neo Air is a respin of the astonishingly affordable, $8 NanoPi Neo that shipped in July, and has the same 40 x 40mm dimensions as the Neo, making the two boards the smallest quad-core SBCs around. The Neo Air adds WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, 8GB eMMC, and a DVP camera connector while sacrificing the Ethernet and USB host ports. It debuts at $18, but will eventually move to $20. Read more

Lubuntu 16.10 Beta 2 Comes with LXDE as LXQt Got Postponed Until Lubuntu 17.04

As part of today's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Final Beta release, Simon Quigley and hard working folks from the Lubuntu team had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Lubuntu 16.10 Beta 2. Read more