Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reiser tells authorities he strangled his wife during argument

Filed under
Reiser

Convicted killer Hans Reiser has admitted that he strangled his estranged wife Nina Reiser during a argument while his children played unaware in another part of the house in the Oakland hills, sources familiar with the investigation told the Oakland Tribune today.

Handcuffed to his attorney, Reiser led authorities Monday to what he says are the remains of his missing wife, Nina Reiser. The body was buried in a 4-foot-deep hole in the Oakland hills.

Sources said the murder occurred on Sept. 3, 2006, the last day Nina Resier was seen alive. It still isn't clear when Reiser moved her body, but he said he wrapped her body in sheets of plastic and later carried her in a duffle bag and carried to her unmarked grave.

"His motivation for (taking authorities to the grave) was to put some resolution to the whole thing and improve his posture with the case and bring closure to the family," Du Bois said.

That could mean Reiser is allowed to plead to the lesser crime of second-degree murder, which carries a sentence of 15 years to life as opposed to 25 years to life for first-degree murder.

"He realized that to ever be paroled, he would have to acknowledge responsibility and show remorse," Du Bois said.

The body was down a steep hillside in the 8200 block of Skyline Boulevard, which was a half-mile from where Hans Reiser was living with his mother.

More Here




Also: Reiser: Guilty. Reiser4 Lives On

Police ID remains as software programmer's wife

AP @ SFGate: Police have confirmed that a body software programmer Hans Reiser led them to is that of the estranged wife he is convicted of killing.

Reiser led police Monday to remains buried not far from his home in the Oakland hills. Authorities say they were able to identify the body as Nina Reiser's through dental records, jewelry and clothing.

More Here

Subject Title

That Subject Title was so convoluted I thought it was a ATANG1 post.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Add-on board expands i.MX6 UL SBC

MYIR released an add-on board for its Linux-driven, i.MX6 UL-based MYS-6ULX SBC that adds a second LAN port, plus CAN, RS485, camera, audio, and RTC. In April, MYIR released a Linux-powered MYS-6ULX SBC, which was notable for being available in two different versions using NXP’s low power, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) or the more affordable, and almost identical i.MX6 ULL SoC. Now, MYIR has released an “MYB-6ULX Expansion Board” designed to stack onto either model. The $21.20 accessory adds a second 10/100 Ethernet port to the MYS-6ULX, as well as new CAN, RS485, audio, micro-USB, RTC, and camera functions. Read more

Hardware: PocketBeagle, Purism Librem 5, Aaeon Embedded PCs

Finding the Mainframers of the Future Through Open Source Ecosystem Development

Speak the word “mainframe” to many millennial techies, and the first things that likely come to mind are in the form of grainy sepia photos of floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall computers with big spinning tapes. But that’s far from the reality of the modern mainframe. Imagine instead up to 240 10-core, 5.2ghz processors, 32TB of RAIM (redundant array of independent memory), hardware-based encryption, and fully hot-swappable hardware components. Those are the specs of the newly released IBM z14 – a single machine that could replace the computing resources of an average corporate data center with room to spare. Read more

Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Days and KDE's Randa

  • Introducing The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Days
    One of my primary goals at The Linux Foundation is to foster innovation across the entire open source networking ecosystem. This involves coordinating across multiple open source projects and initiatives and identifying key areas for collaboration to create an open source networking stack. We are working across the entire ecosystem with industry-leading partners — from developers to service providers to vendors — to unify various open source components and create solutions that will accelerate network transformation. As part of this journey, I am pleased to introduce Open Source Networking Days (OSN Days), a series of free events that are hosted and organized by local user groups and The Linux Foundation members, with support from our projects, including DPDK, FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, PNDA, and others.
  • Randa news, release update
    Last week, from wednesday to saturday I attended KDE’s annual Randa sprint organized by wonderful people. This was an occasion to work fulltime on Kdenlive.