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Securing your Ubuntu box, don’t worry it’s easy!

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Linux is generally regarded as secure:

But as preachy as Ubuntu gets about not using a root terminal, you’d think that they must ship this really secure operating system, right?

Well….yes and no.

They actually have a pretty good security framework, the bad news is that most of it is turned off by default, meaning that an Ubuntu box would be a relatively easy target for a malicious hacker should a security hole be found and exploited, I know that this hasn’t normally been an issue on Linux, but the idea of exposing a system without even a basic firewall or application security policy to the open internet is still a really bad one, so I implore you to spend 5 minutes of your time locking things down, and be assured that this will not likely affect performance or inconvenience you in any way.

The different approaches to security by Ubuntu and Fedora:

Fedora ships with SELinux with a Targeted policy, in a nutshell, the Targeted policy was a compromise between securing the whole system and not securing anything, it’s designed to protect the most likely services to be abused by a hacker, you can also deploy the Strict policy by downloading it and applying it in the SELinux configuration program, but this has about a 6-7% overhead and it really is overkill and will likely pretty much destroy your day to day operations on the system if used.

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