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Lost GUI in PCLinuxOS

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PCLinuxOS

I'm just a newbe to Linux world. Today I was just messing with the screen resolution in PCLOS 2007, unfortunately I lost the GUI. Tried "startx" command didn't work. Someone please help me. Thankyou.

sounds like a messed xorg.conf

I'm no linux guru either, but it seems to me that you messed up your xorg.conf. type "cd /etc/X11" and then "ls" to see, if there is a backup of it("xorg.conf.backup", "xorg.conf.old", something like that). Now backup the existing xorg.conf: "cp xorg.conf xorg.conf.MYBACKUP", where xorg.conf.MYBACKUP is the name you want to give to your backup. Next, overwrite the existing xorg.conf that you just backuped: "mv xorg.conf.backup xorg.conf", where xorg.conf.backup is the original backup file you found in the first step. If nothing went wrong, "startx" should now start the GUI.

In case that there was no backup file, or that this backup file is corrupted as well, you should definately post the error created when you type "startx"(doing that is usually the first step, just wanted to give you a first help). Maybe you only have to fix the lines that set the resolution in your xorg.conf. But don't forget to backup before you do big changes to it!

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