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Linux in Flight: The Penguin Grows Wings

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Being an avid fan of aircraft and flight (ref: extreme high performance flying), one of the things that has always caught my interest was the ever improving design of aircraft, engines and avionics. The enhancements and improvements in aircraft, systems and instrumentation has been nothing short of miraculous. But by now you might be asking yourself, "So what does this have to do with Linux?" A lot. Linux has become quite the integral part of the aviation industry these days, so much so that in some respects, Tux has grown wings. Just how is this happening? Let me show you.

The first and most visible (at least to the general public) introduction of Linux into the aviation industry is the Linux powered in-flight entertainment systems (as previously mentioned here) used on Singapore Airlines, as well as numerous other carriers. What you may not know about is the other areas of the airline industry that Linux has entered that only industry insiders and employees would ever be aware of. The first of these is in flight avionics.

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