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Will Linux Benefit from Microsoft's SNAFU in Massachusetts?

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David Berlind over at ZDNet wrote a remarkable article called Did Microsoft send the wrong guy to Massachusetts' ODF hearing?. If you missed this article, you'll have missed the equivalent of what Intel's Andy Grove called an inflection point. This one has the potential to have more impact than the release of the first Pentium processor.

David believes that Microsoft should have sent Bill Gates or Steve Ballmer to the hearing. In light of the continuing anti-trust litigation between Microsoft and the Commonwealth, one has to wonder if either Microsoft executive would have been appropriate.

Shortly after the announcement of the Commonwealth's decision to require the Open Document Format for all state agencies, Australia compelled its entire government to adopt the same. One only has to wonder who else will follow. I would expect all countries across the global to break Redmond's de facto standard.

How does this hurt Microsoft?

Full Story.

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