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Struggling towards a great Linux desktop

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Linux

I'm very happy with my Linux desktop. To be precise, I'm very happy with SLED (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop) 10 SP2; openSUSE 11, Kubuntu 8.04, Mint 5 and MEPIS 7. I'm also getting fond of Fedora 9.

Anyone see the problem here? I do.

That's too many desktops, except for a nut case like yours truly who really likes playing with operating systems. Most people, most sane people anyway, want one desktop that works for them and can at least get along with the other desktops in the office.

The beauty of Linux is that you can have a safe, powerful desktop operating system. The ugly thing about Linux is that it can you also give you enough options to drive you batty.

Now, I can tell you, after asking a few questions what Linux is likely to work best for you. Three quick examples: You want a desktop to deploy over an enterprise; SLED 10 SP2's your best choice. Want one for the home, right now I'd say Ubuntu/Kubuntu 8.04 pre-installed on a Dell PC or Mint if you want to do it yourself. Want one that looks and acts a lot like Windows XP, then Xandros comes to mind.

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