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openSUSE 11.0 x86_64 Review

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SUSE

I have finished setting up openSUSE 11.0 on my HP dv2000z AMD Turion64 X2. Up to version 10.3 I was running the 32-bit version of SUSE and decided now was a good time to do a 'New' install and give x86_64 a spin.

The YaST install interface, written in Qt4, has received a major facelift, and is visually very easy on the eyes. Since this was a new install I accepted the suggested partitioning option (2Gb Linux swap partition with one primary partition for everything else). I've been following the KDE4 developments over the past months and opted to go with installing KDE 3.5.9 and will hope to reevaluate KDE 4.1 later this year.

In the Install list I added the kernel sources and development tools which includes the
gcc compiler. For applications that don't come in rpm format your only other option is source code tar.gz tar.bz2 format, which means you need to download and compile the sources at the command-line with ./configure, make and make install.

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