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Linux Adoption For The Windows User

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Linux

In today's market IT professionals face a wide array of issues ranging from virus outbreaks to security flaws. These problems have spurred a revolution called Linux and Open Source.

IT professionals face a wide variety of issues ranging form virus outbreaks to security flaws across the board. In fact, advisories from IT-security services have grown from less than 300 per month to an average well above that for 2005. Of those advisories, 72% of them were of a nature where they could be executed remotely. These problems have spurred a revolution in the IT industry.

As this trend grows, concerns are arising about how safe your data is and whether systems that don't share their inter-workings can move rapidly to address these growing trends.

The Linux and Open Source community as a whole have developed greatly from the days of command prompts and command lines evolving into enterprise class systems with complex and useful graphical interfaces. This offers enterprises more choices than they ever had before as systems using open standards are transportable from one vendor to another. Applications can be hosted on Microsoft or Linux servers. Back office solutions like Apache Web servers (www.apache.org) can reside on Windows Servers until their logical end of life and then be migrated to a Linux platform when and if you choose to move later on.

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