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OLPC spin-off developing UI for Intel's Classmate PC

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Linux

Intel could give its Classmate PC a user interface similar to One Laptop Per Child's XO laptop, with the chipmaker preparing a version of the Sugar UI found on OLPC's laptops for its educational laptop.

Intel has tied up with Sugar Labs Foundation to develop a version of Sugar, the UI originally developed for OLPC's XO laptop, for its Classmate PC, said Walter Bender, a founder of Sugar Labs and OLPC's former president of software and content.

"A community volunteer is working with Intel on Sugar for the Classmate PC. Sugar Labs helped to expedite the relationship," said Bender in an interview.

The move comes six months after Intel resigned from OLPC's board after refusing to abandon its Classmate PC program in favor of OLPC's efforts to promote XO laptops in developing countries.

Intel declined comment on Sugar's development for the Classmate PC.

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