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Microsoft Monopoly Will Wane, Experts Say

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Microsoft

Microsoft's Explorer browser is already losing market share. It recently fell below the 90 percent mark because of competition from such rivals as the Firefox open-source browser. The Massachusetts Institute of Techology's Thomas Malone said he wouldn't predict how much Microsoft's dominance might fall.

Don't dump your stocks in the software giant, experts warn.

But they also say the "days of Microsoft's hegemony may soon be over," according to a new report by Framingham, Mass.-based ComputerWorld.

"What you might see is an 800-pound gorilla on steroids [today] and five years from now it might be a 400-pound gorilla on vitamins," said Don Tennant, editor of ComputerWorld, which recently held a panel discussion among experts about the future of the information technology sector.

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