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Is The PC Dead For Gamers?

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Gaming

Here's a big question that has been making the rounds of late: "Is the PC dead as a gaming platform?" It comes amidt the hype and apple sauce that typically accompany the launch of a new generation of consoles, though one cannot simply dismiss the question out of hand as simple console hysteria.

The truth of the matter is that the PC has been in decline for many years now as a gaming platform. Even Microsoft, ever loath to criticise its own mistakes, has admitted that it has been "killing" the PC as a gaming platform in recent years by concentrating on consoles.

The main problem lies with the fact that the PC is an infinitely more complicated and quantifiably more expensive piece of technology than an off-the-shelf, standardised console. For Joe Teenager, Soccer Mom or even Sam Professional, the PC requires far too much time and maintenance, which has made the simpler consoles become the platform of choice.

Throw a disc in, flip a switch and you have your game in front of you. Attach another controller to the console and stick it in your friend's hand and you have a multiplayer game. No BIOS, no booting, no operating system, no pings, no network connections... disc goes in, console goes on, fun ensues.

But does all this mean that the PC really is a dead duck as far as gaming goes?

Full Story.

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