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Test your environment's security with BackTrack

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Linux

In the field of penetration testing, BackTrack is today's premier Linux distribution. Designed for, created by, and used by security professionals around the globe, BackTrack is the result of a merger between two earlier, competing distributions -- WHAX and Auditor Security Collection. The most recent beta version was released on June 10.

BackTrack 3.0 beta (BT3) is showing up in a lot of places these days. There was a presentation in February at ShmooCon, an annual hacker convention. At this year's National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (NCCDC), it was the distro of choice for the Red Team -- the attackers -- made up of experienced security professionals.

BT3 live or installed

BT3 is distributed as an ISO image for a live CD or as a larger USB drive version in RAR format. You can grab the image online from any of several mirrors, then either burn a bootable CD or install it on a bootable USB drive.

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